Economic Assessment of Sustainable Cotton Production in Maharashtra, India

A. D. Dhunde *

Department of Agricultural Economics, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

V. G. Naik

Department of Agricultural Economics, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

D. B. Malave

Department of Agricultural Economics, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

J. R. Kadam

Department of Extension Education, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

J. S. Dhekale

Department of Agricultural Economics, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

S. R. Torane

Department of Agricultural Economics, Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Maharashtra, India.

C. Sundaramoorthy

ICAR- Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technology, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Cotton, the king of fibers is often quoted as ‘White Gold’ because of its higher commercial values. It is a primary raw material in the textile industries. Cotton, cotton yarn, cotton fabrics and garments have substantial demand in the global market. Cotton is the most important fibre crop of India playing a dominant role in its agrarian and industrial economy. In the present study efforts have been made to study the cost, returns, profitability of organic and conventional cotton. The primary data required for the study were collected during year 2021-22 from 320 cotton growers of Maharashtra. Simple statistical tools like averages and percentages were used in analysing the collected data and standard cost concepts was used for analysis. The result of the study examined that, the total cost of production (cost ‘C’) of cotton was worked out to Rs. 87633 and Rs. 72683 in conventional irrigated and conventional rainfed cotton cultivation, respectively, the per hectare conventional rainfed cotton production was worked out to be 13.18 qtls. The per hectare conventional irrigated cotton production was worked out to be 20.95 qtls. The benefit-cost ratio was estimated to 2.09 and 1.77 for irrigated and rainfed respectively, This indicated that, organic irrigated cotton production was more profitable than organic rainfed cotton. Organic cotton farming promises to be a more sustainable form of agriculture that is aimed at producing food in a more environmentally friendly, economically viable and socially just way. Organic methods also have wider social and environmental benefits that come from the use of sustainable methods.

Keywords: Organic cotton, profitability, sustainability, Maharashtra


How to Cite

Dhunde , A. D., V. G. Naik, D. B. Malave, J. R. Kadam, J. S. Dhekale, S. R. Torane, and C. Sundaramoorthy. 2022. “Economic Assessment of Sustainable Cotton Production in Maharashtra, India”. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change 12 (12):1812-18. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2022/v12i121629.

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