Growth and Yield Performance of Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) at Different Building Heights of Rooftop Gardening

Md. Mostakim Billah Fahim

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

Md. Golam Jilani Helal

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

Tania Sultana

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

Zannatul Firdaus Binte Habib

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

Md. Ujjal Husen

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

Abdul Halim *

Department of Agroforestry and Environmental Science, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka-1207, Bangladesh.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Rooftop gardening is very important for food security and environmental restoration, but if it is not economically feasible on the basis of productivity than rooftop gardening will not increase and sustain. To know the productivity at different heights of buildings roof, an experiment was conducted at the ground and the rooftop of different buildings at Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka within a seven months period spanning through dry and rainy seasons. The experiment was laid out in a Completely Randomized Design with four replications containing four pots in each replicate. The plant material was BARI Tomato -14 and treatments of this experiment were T1= Control (Ground level, 0.0 m), T2= Rooftop of three storied building (11.28 m), T3 = Rooftop of six storied building (21.34 m), T4 = Rooftop of ten storied building (34.75 m). Different height of buildings rooftop showed significant effects on the air temperature, moisture of pot soil, growth, yield contributing characters and yield of tomato. The treatment T1 showed significantly higher moisture content of pot soil, plant height, plant stem diameter, branch number per plant, leaf number per plant, flower cluster number per plant, fruit number per plant, fruit length, fruit diameter, individual fruit weight and yield per plant than all other treatments but T4 showed significantly lowest results in all the above mentioned characters and Vice versa in case of air temperature. Growth and yield of tomato showed a gradually decreasing results with the increasing of buildings rooftop height. The sequence of growth and yield of tomato were T1>T2>T3>T4.

Keywords: Height, rooftop, temperature, moisture, yield


How to Cite

Fahim , M. M. B., Helal , M. G. J., Sultana , T., Habib , Z. F. B., Husen , M. U., & Halim , A. (2023). Growth and Yield Performance of Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) at Different Building Heights of Rooftop Gardening. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 13(8), 1593–1605. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2023/v13i82109

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Nations U. World urbanization prospects: The 2014 Revision; 2014.

Opitz I, Berges R, Piorr A, Krikser T. Contributing to food security in urban areas: Differences between urban agriculture and peri-urban agriculture in the global North. Agriculture and Human Values. 2016;33(2):341–358.

O’Sullivan CA, Bonnett GD, McIntyre CL, Hochman Z, Wasson AP. Strategies to improve the productivity, product diversity and profitability of urban agriculture. Agricultural Systems. 2019;174:133– 144.

Walsh LE, Mead BR, Hardman CA, Evans D, Liu L, Falagán N. (2022). Potential of urban green spaces for supporting horticul-tural production: A national scale analysis. Environmental Research Letters. 2022; 17(1):1–15.

The Huffington Post. World's largest rooftop farm documents incredible growth high above Brooklyn; 2014.

Specht K, Siebert R, Hartmann I, Freisinger UB, Sawicka M, Werner A. Urban agriculture of the future: An overview of sustainability aspects of food production in and on buildings. Agric. Hum. 2014;31:33–51.

Thomaier S, Specht K, Henckel D, Dierich A, Siebert R, Freisinger UB. Farming in and on urban buildings: present practice and specific novelties of zero-acreage farming (ZFarming). Renew. Agric. Food Syst. 2015;30:43–54.

Whittinghill L, Starry O. Up on the roof: considerations for food production on rooftops,” in Sowing Seeds in the City: Ecosystem and Municipal Services, eds S. Brown, K. McIvor and E. Hodges Snyder (Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands). 2016; 325–338.

Gupta G, Mehta P. Roof top farming a solution to food security and climate change adaptation for cities. Springer international publishing AG, Climate Change Research at Universities; 2017.

Begum MS, Bala SK, Islam AKMS, Roy D. Environmental and Social dynamics of urban rooftop agriculture (URTA) and Their impacts on microclimate change. Sustainability. 2021;13(16):9053

BBS. Population and housing census 2011. Urban Area Report. 2014;3.

Choguill CL. Urban agriculture and cities in the developing world, Habitat International. 1995;19(2):149-235.

Islam KMS. Rooftop gardening as a strategy of urban agriculture for

food security: the case of dhaka city, Bangladesh. Proc. IC on Urban

Horticulture Eds: R. Junge-Berberovic et al. ActaHort 643, ISHS. 2004;241-247.

Sanyé-Mengual E, Anguelovski I, Oliver-Solà J, Montero J, Rieradevall J. Resolving differing stakeholder perceptions of urban rooftop farming in Mediterranean cities: promoting food production as a driver for innovative forms of urban agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values. 2015;33(1):1-20.

BBS. Statistical year book of Bangladesh. Bangladesh bureau of statistics, statistical

division, ministry of planning, government of the people’s republic of Bangladesh; 2013.

Rai R, Zhang Y, Paudel B. A synthesis of studies on land use and land cover dynamics during 1930–2015 in Bangladesh. Sustainability. 2017;9(10).

Islam S. Study on impact of land fragmentation in agriculture – a case of Rajshahi district, Bangladesh. International Journal of Recent Research in Social Sciences and Humanities. 2014;1(1):54–61.

Ahmed A. Some of the major environmental problems relating to land use changes in the coastal areas of Bangladesh. A review. Journal of Geography and Regional Planning. 2011;4(1):1–8.

Hasan ABMSU, Rahman MZ. Change in temperature over Bangladesh associated with degrees of global warming. Asian Journal of Applied Science and Engineering. 2013;2(2):161–174.

BBS. Population projection of Bangladesh – dynamics and trends, 2011-2061. Bangladesh bureau of statistics, ministry of planning, government of the people’s republic of Bangladesh; 2015.

BBS. Statistical year book of Bangladesh, Bangladesh bureau of statistics, ministryof planning, Govt. of Bangladesh; 2018.

FAO. Statistical year book 2015/2016. FAO. Rome. 2017;2.

Avaiable:Retrieval fromwww.fao.org

BBS. Statistical year book, statistics division, ministry of planing, government of

peoples republic of Bangladesh; 2016.

Wu L, Zhang X, Xiao G. Effects of environmental factors on tomato growth. Agricultural Science & Technology; Changsha. 2015;6(2):272-277.

Reeves PH, Coupland G. Response of plant development to environment: Control of flowering by daylength and temperature Curr. Opin. Plant Biol. 2000;3(1):37-42.

Snider JL, Oosterhuis DM. How does timing, duration, and severity of heat stress influence pollen–pistil interactions in angiosperms? Plant Signal. Behav. 2011;6(7):930-933.

Maham SG, Rahimi A, Subramanian S, Smith DL. The environmental impacts of organic greenhouse tomato production based on the nitrogen-fixing plant (Azolla). Journal of Cleaner Production. 2020;245.

Abdelmageed AH, Gruda N, Geyer B. Effect of high temperature and heat shock on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) genotypes under controlled conditions; Conference on international agricultural research for development, Deutscher Tropentag, Göttingen. October, 2003;8- 10.

Sibomana IC, Aguyoh JN, Opiyo AM. Water stress affects growth and yield of container grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill) plants; G.J.B.B. 2013;2(4):461-466.

Liu J, Hu T, Feng P, Feng P, Wang L, Yang S. Tomato yield and water use efficiency change with various soil moisture and potassium levels during different growth stages; PLoS ONE. 2019;14: 3.

Abdalla AA, Verkerk K. Growth, flowering, and fruit set of the tomato at high temperature; Neth. J. Agr. Sci., 1968; 16:71-76.

Abdul BAA. Tolerance of tomato cultivars and selected germplasm to heat stress; J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1991;116(6):1113-1116.

Peet MM, Willits DH Gardner R. Response of ovule development and post-pollen production processes in male-sterile tomatoes to chronic, sub-acute high temperature stress. J. Experimental Botany. 1997;48(306):101-111.

El AAB, Stevens MA. Reproductive responses of heat-tolerant tomatoes to high temperature; J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1979;104(5):686-691.

Palta PJ. Instrumentation for studying vegetation canopies for remote sensing in optical and thermal infrared regions. Remote Sensing Reviews. 1990;5(1):207-213.

Ibukun TA, Kelly TM. Increasing air temperatures and its effects on growth and productivity of tomato in South Florida. Journal of Plants. 2020;9(9):1245.

Hao L, Duan AW, Sun JS, Liang YY. Effects of soil moisture regime on greenhouse tomato yield and its formation under drip irrigation; Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao. 2009;20(11):2699-704.

Hurd RG, Grave CJ. Some effects of air and root temperatures on the yield and quality of glasshouse tomatoes. Journal of Horticultural Science. 1985;60:359-371.

Dinar M, Rudich J. Effect of heat stress on assimilates partitioning in tomato. Ann.Bot. 1985;56:239-249.