Honeybee Flora for Commercial Beekeeping in Manipur, India

Jenita Thokchom

South Asian Institute of Rural and Agricultural Management, Langjing Achouba, Imphal West-795113, Manipur, India.

Rocky Thokchom *

South Asian Institute of Rural and Agricultural Management, Langjing Achouba, Imphal West-795113, Manipur, India.

Romila Akoijam

ICAR, NEH Region, Lamphelpat, Imphal, Manipur, India.

Sanjay Singh Sanasam

ICAR, NEH Region, Lamphelpat, Imphal, Manipur, India.

Yengkokpam Ranjana Devi

CAU, Lamphelpat, Imphal, Manipur, India.

Kumar Singh Potsangbam

South Asian Institute of Rural and Agricultural Management, Langjing Achouba, Imphal West-795113, Manipur, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Beekeeping, otherwise known as apiculture is a lucrative business providing supplementary or major income to the people in rural areas. Honey has certain health benefits, with its nutritional composition closely similar to fruits and is a natural sweetener. Honeybees are also a good pollinator and gives valued products such as beewax, propolis, bee venom, etc. However, for commercial beekeeping, selection of bee species is very important and for yearly flow of honey, a beekeeper should know the flora preferred by the bees for every seasons. The present study revealed that, out of the total 161 plant species identified, which is visited by the honeybees (Apis cerana and Apis mellifera) for nectar and pollen, maximum plant species belong to the horticultural crops (33%) followed by the wild plants and forest trees (29%); and ornamental plants and avenue trees (28%). The least (10%) was recorded in agronomic crops.

Keywords: Apiculture, Apis cerana, Apis mellifera, bee flora


How to Cite

Thokchom , Jenita, Rocky Thokchom, Romila Akoijam, Sanjay Singh Sanasam, Yengkokpam Ranjana Devi, and Kumar Singh Potsangbam. 2023. “Honeybee Flora for Commercial Beekeeping in Manipur, India”. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change 13 (9):51-64. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2023/v13i92204.

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