Identification and Analysis of Transgressive Segregants in F2 Rice Populations: A Cross-Study of Naveen x IR 64 Drt1 for Enhanced Yield Traits

Jenny P. Ekka *

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

Priyanka Kumari

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

Swapnil

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bihar Agricultural University, Sabour, Bihar, India.

Krishna Prasad

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

Manigopa Chakarbarty

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

Ekhlaque Ahmed

Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Not all crosses display it, and only a small proportion of progeny in any particular cross may be transgressive, but it occurs frequently enough that plant breeding works as a matter of routine. The traditional thinking in plant breeding holds that transgressive segregants are the most rare individuals in the population. However, depending on the level or clarity with which the phenotypic is investigated, it is reasonable to believe that this phenomenon may be more widespread in plant breeding populations than is now recognized. In the present study the F2 segregants that surpassed both the parentals and had higher values than the increasing parent, were observed in the cross (Naveen x IR64 Drt 1) for all the characters viz plant height, number of panicles, panicle length, number of primary branches, number of filled grains, total number of spikelets and 1000 grain weight except for the character number of secondary branches. The maximum number of transgressives were observed for the character panicle length for the cross Naveen x IR 64 Drt1.

Keywords: F2 rice populations, transgressive segregants, plant breeding


How to Cite

Ekka, J. P., Kumari, P., Swapnil, Prasad, K., Chakarbarty, M., & Ahmed, E. (2023). Identification and Analysis of Transgressive Segregants in F2 Rice Populations: A Cross-Study of Naveen x IR 64 Drt1 for Enhanced Yield Traits. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 13(10), 1441–1446. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2023/v13i102798

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