Spatial Assessment of Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity in the Tropical Littoral City of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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P. Nwaerema
Ojeh N. Vincent
C. Amadou
Atuma, I. Morrison

Abstract

The study examined Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Land Surface Emissivity (LSE) in a tropical coastal city of Port Harcourt and its environs. Satellite remote sensing of multiple-wavelength origin was employed to derive data from the Landsat Enhance Thematic Mapper (ETM+). Statistical mean and range were used to show pattern of LST and LSE. The study established the relationship and characteristics of land use land cover, built-up area and influence of population on land surfaces. With population of over 3,095,342 persons occupying surface area of approximately 458,28 Km2, rapid vegetal and water body lost have put the city area under pressure of 4.7°C heat bias at the interval of 15 years. From rural fringes to the city center, LST varies with 9.3°C in wet season and 4.8°C in the dry season. During the dry season, LSE is severe in the southern part of the city contributed by water bodies, more vegetal cover and urban pavement materials. Emissivity in the wet season varied with 0.0136 and 0.0006 during the dry season but differs with 0.0165 between the two seasons. One critical finding is that LSE decreases from the rural fringes to the city center and LST increases from the rural fringes to the city center. It is recommended that urban greening at the city center should be practiced and the rural fringes should be explored by decongesting activities at the city center to the outskirts in order to ameliorate the effects of urban heat bias without further delay.

Keywords:
Port Harcourt, land use type, land surface temperature, land surface emissivity

Article Details

How to Cite
Nwaerema, P., Vincent, O., Amadou, C., & Morrison, A. (2019). Spatial Assessment of Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity in the Tropical Littoral City of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 9(2), 88-103. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2019/v9i230099
Section
Original Research Article