Air Pollution Tolerance Index for Selected Species of Plants in Roadside Highways at Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Main Article Content

Rahul Nishad
Harsh Bodh Paliwal
Makhan Singh Karada
Dheer Agnihotri

Abstract

In recent years air pollution is one of the biggest problems in the world. Owing to the transboundary dispersion of contaminants around the world, air pollution has its own peculiarities. In a much planned urban setup industrial pollution takes a backseat and cooler admission takes the president's as the major cause of urban air pollution in the present investigation your pollution torrents index was calculated for various plant species growing around the Allahabad Highway. Five plants available commonly in all locations were selected for the present research namely Azadirachta indica (Neem), Delonix regia (Gulmohar), Saraca asoca (Ashok), Ficus benghalensis (Bargad), Ficus religiosa (Pepal). Using normal procedures, ascorbic acid, leaf extract pH, overall chlorophyll, relative water content and air quality tolerance index were analysed. Both plants tested in both areas have been shown to be pollution-sensitive, varying from 02.29 to 12.53. No pollution tolerant organisms studied were found. The maximum value of pH was 7.8 found in Neem tree spp. (Azadirachta indica) in Rewa Road (NH-35) and the minimum value of pH was 5.9 found in Gulmohar tree spp. (Delonix regia) in Varanasi Road (NH-19), The maximum value of RWC (89.99 %) found in Ashok tree spp. (Saraca asoca) and the minimum value of RWC (58.64 %) found in Neem tree spp. (Azadirachta indica) in Mirzapur Road site (NH-76). The maximum value of Total Chlorophyll Content was 1.55 mg/g found in Ashok tree spp. (Saraca asoca) in Mirzapur Road (NH-76) and the minimum value of Total Chlorophyll Content was 0.71 mg/g found in Bargad tree spp. (Ficus benghalensis) in Control Site and Rewa Road (NH-35). The maximum value of Ascorbic Acid (1.07 mg/g) found in Ashok tree spp. (Saraca asoca) in Rewa Road site (NH-35) and the minimum value of Ascorbic Acid (0.39 mg/g) found in Pepal tree spp. (Ficus religiosa) in Mirzapur Road site (NH-76) The variance may be due to alternative biochemical parameters being reflected. Plant can filter the air through aerial elements especially through their twigs stem leaves air pollution management is the better manage by the afforestation program. Air pollution tolerance index (APTI) is an intrinsic quality of tree to control air pollution problem which is currently of major concern of local urban locality. The trees having higher tolerance index rate or tolerant towards air pollution and can be used as a major component to reduce air pollution whereas the tree having less tolerance index can be an indicator to know the rate of air pollution. Hence, it is essential to protect the plants.

Keywords:
pH of leaf extract, relative water content, ascorbic acid, chlorophyll, APTI.

Article Details

How to Cite
Nishad, R., Paliwal, H. B., Karada, M. S., & Agnihotri, D. (2020). Air Pollution Tolerance Index for Selected Species of Plants in Roadside Highways at Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 10(12), 247-254. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2020/v10i1230301
Section
Original Research Article

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