Effect of Organic Farming Practices on Soil Chemical Properties

Manjunatha Bhanuvally

Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Agriculture Extension Education Centre, Hadagali, Karnataka, 586127, India.

Sunitha N. H.

Department of Home Science, Agriculture Extension Education Centre, Hadagali, Karnataka, 586127, India.

Sharanabasava *

Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur, Karnataka, 584104, India.

Ravi S.

Department of Soil Science, ICAR - KVK, Hagari, Karnataka, 583111, India.

Mahadevaswamy

Department of Agricultural Microbiology, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur, Karnataka, 584104, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

A survey was conducted in the Bellary district Northern Dry Zone of Karnataka (zone-3). Only those farmers who had been practicing it for more than five years were selected and information on the type and quantity of organics used by them in different cropping systems viz., Groundnut, Ragi, Onion, Drumstick and Maize was collected, Soil samples from the selected 30 organic farms and the neighboring conventional farms under the same cropping system were also collected. The results revealed that organic farming approaches enhance the chemical composition of soil, augment the availability of macro and micronutrients, and elevate the soil's organic carbon status—all of which are critical for sustainable crop yields. It is possible to draw the conclusion that organic agricultural practices positively impact soil characteristics and sustainable yield, hence improving soil health.

Keywords: Organic farming, conventional farming, cropping system, nutrient status


How to Cite

Bhanuvally, M., Sunitha N. H., Sharanabasava, Ravi S., & Mahadevaswamy. (2024). Effect of Organic Farming Practices on Soil Chemical Properties. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 14(2), 470–481. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2024/v14i23962

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