Modeling Evapotranspiration Using SWAT for the Middle Narmada Catchment

Rajat Mishra *

Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, 263145, Uttarakhand, India.

Praveen Vikram Singh

Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, 263145, Uttarakhand, India.

Anil Kumar

Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, 263145, Uttarakhand, India.

Pramod Kumar Singh

Department of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, 263145, Uttarakhand, India.

Pravendra Kumar

Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, 263145, Uttarakhand, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

This study delves into the hydrological dynamics of a region by analyzing monthly and annual datasets that encompass the intricate interplay among rainfall, potential evapotranspiration (PET), and actual evapotranspiration (ET) using SWAT model for the Gadarwara watershed of middle Narmada catchment. The research identifies a distinct wet season characterized by escalating precipitation from January to June, peaking in July and August. Interestingly, despite heightened rainfall during these months a decline in actual evapotranspiration is discerned, hinting at potential environmental influences. The transition from the wet to the dry season reveals a cyclical pattern culminating in minimal ET values in December. The annual dataset unveils years marked by significant variability in rainfall, ET, and PET, underscoring the region's responsiveness to climatic fluctuations. These insights bear paramount importance for sectors such as agriculture and water resource management, facilitating strategic planning during periods of elevated water availability. Furthermore, the data contributes to the calibration and validation of SWAT, enhancing their reliability in simulating real-world processes. In sum, the comprehensive dataset enhances our understanding of regional hydrology, offering guidance for sustainable water management practices amid evolving climatic conditions.

Keywords: Evapotranspiration, water scarcity, water affects, ecosystems, SWAT model


How to Cite

Mishra , R., Singh , P. V., Kumar , A., Singh, P. K., & Kumar , P. (2024). Modeling Evapotranspiration Using SWAT for the Middle Narmada Catchment. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change, 14(2), 634–641. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2024/v14i23977

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