Kitchen Gardening: A Dual Solution for Urban Heat Islands and Nutritional Security in India

Ankush Mohapatra

Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab-144411, India.

Deven Verma *

Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab-144411, India.

Sakshi Sharma

Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab-144411, India.

Aparnna Rani Swain

Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab-144411, India.

Abhishek Singh

Department of Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab-144411, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Urbanization has led to significant environmental and societal challenges, including the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect and nutritional insecurity. Kitchen gardening, also known as urban horticulture, emerges as a promising solution to these pressing issues. By cultivating food in urban settings, individuals and families contribute to a more sustainable and resilient ecosystem. The practice of kitchen gardening plays a pivotal role in managing the UHI effect. Vegetation in urban areas helps moderate temperature extremes, reducing the heat retained by concrete and asphalt. This cooling effect contributes to lower energy consumption for air conditioning, mitigating urban pollution and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, the proximity of urban gardens to residential areas decreases the need for transportation of produce, further cutting down on pollution and energy usage associated with food distribution. From a nutritional standpoint, kitchen gardening ensures food security by providing a direct source of fresh, healthy produce. This practice aligns with several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including zero hunger (SDG2), good health and well-being (SDG3), and responsible consumption and production (SDG12). Urban horticulture empowers individuals to take control of their food sources, promoting a balanced diet and reducing dependence on industrial-scale farming. Furthermore, it creates opportunities for community engagement and economic growth, supporting decent work and economic growth (SDG8) and sustainable cities and communities (SDG11). Kitchen gardening is a multifaceted approach that addresses both environmental and nutritional challenges. Its benefits extend beyond individual households, contributing to broader sustainability goals and fostering a more harmonious relationship between urban development and the environment.

Keywords: Resilient, UHI effect, vegetation, sustainable, SDGs, urban horticulture, pollution


How to Cite

Mohapatra, Ankush, Deven Verma, Sakshi Sharma, Aparnna Rani Swain, and Abhishek Singh. 2024. “Kitchen Gardening: A Dual Solution for Urban Heat Islands and Nutritional Security in India”. International Journal of Environment and Climate Change 14 (4):614-23. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijecc/2024/v14i44146.

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